Archive for February 28th, 2017

Be A Hero Contest – 2017

28 February 2017

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Deadline: May 29, 2017

(midnight – Eastern Standard Time (EST))

At this precarious time in the United States, we need people to be heroes. This isn’t a battle between Republicans and Democrats. This is a battle between right and wrong. And we need heroes who are willing to fight for what is right—across this country and around the world.

In that spirit, we invite you to write a story about a hero in 50 words or fewer. (You can use a title, if you choose, which doesn’t go into the word count.) It should be about someone who fought for the right thing in a way that called for courage and commitment. This can be a personal story about, say, your father rescuing you when you were lost in the woods, or a public story about, say, Rosa Parks not moving to the back of the bus. It could also be a made-up story, even an artful retelling of a favorite, such as Erin Brockovich or A Tale of Two Cities.

We will send the winning entry to each of the 100 U.S. senators and the 435 members of the House of Representatives, along with an entreaty for them to be heroes, protecting our country by standing up for what is obviously right, despite any political risk.

Also, the winner gets a free Gotham class of his or her choosing.

We will broadcast this contest as far and wide as we possibly can, hoping to inspire people everywhere to be heroes.

The Details:

  • Submit a 50-word story about a hero
  • Entry must consist of no more than 50 words. Longer entries will be disregarded.
  • You may use a title, though it’s not essential. But it won’t go into your word count.
  • Entries must be submitted online by midnight – Eastern, May 29, 2017.
  • Only online entries will be accepted.
  • Entry is free. Limit one entry per person.
  • Entry must be original and unpublished.
  • Entries will be judged on originality, quality, spelling, and grammar.
  • Gotham will post the winning entry at GothamWriters.com and send it to all members of the U.S. Congress.
  • The winner will be notified by June 28, 2017.

How to enter, visit the website:

https://www.writingclasses.com/contest/be-a-hero

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Press Release: New Exhibition Announcement – Carnegie Art Museum

28 February 2017

silver-snake-graphite-and-prismacolor-on-arches-paper-30-x-44-in-by-joanne-julian-2016

Carnegie Art Museum

Press Release:  New Exhibition Announcement– 2/14/17

Joanne Julian – Defying Darkness

SELECTED WORKS  2009 – 2016                   

March 12 – May 21, 2017

Opening Reception with artist’s catalog signing/Saturday, March 11th –  4-6pm  $5/ members free

Joanne Julian’s newest exhibition Defying Darkness at the Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard, California traces in over 30 graphite and sumi ink drawings the development in her recent work of a rising fascination for the impacts and subtly iridescent atmosphere of darkness. The artist’s growing understanding and facility with contrasting peacefully white voids with energizing splashes of black has deepened, until now the beauty of darkness has itself become the setting.

Budding evidences of this dark visual challenge in hindsight appears throughout her various series and is displayed in a few, early hinting samples from Julian’s Zen Circles and Botanicals Series. The fascination and investigation, however, hits full stride in recent works in her Fish, Clouds and Skies, and particularly Birds and Feather Series. In these latter, the use of darkness and cropping lends a floating, unanchored, almost celestial quality to the creatures depicted. Yet all are represented with the elegant sparseness that Julian has become noted for over her 30 year career. Coupled with the large –scale of the drawings, Defying Darkness wraps viewers in a quietly dramatic experience.

Joanne Julian was born in Los Angeles. She received her BA and MA degrees in sculpture and printmaking from California State University, Northridge and her MFA degree in painting from Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design. For 34 years she was a full-time faculty member at College of the Canyons in Valencia, California, during which time she was also a half-time faculty member at California State University Northridge. Having studied and traveled in Asia, the influence of Zen Buddhist aesthetics has been noted as an undercurrent in Julian’s art.

The artist has had over 20 solo exhibitions and been featured in 60 group exhibitions nationally.  Among these have been exhibitions at: Jan Baum Gallery in Los Angeles, Thomas Babeor Gallery in La Jolla, Laguna Beach Museum of Art, Newport Harbor Art Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and in 2015 California State University Northridge. Public collections of her work include: Atlantic Richfield, Bank of America, Grand Wailea Resort, Home Savings of America, The Irvine Company, Nestle, Nikko, Price Waterhouse, and Teneco Oil.

Joanne Julian will give an Artist’s Gallery Talk at Carnegie Art Museum in Oxnard on March 30th at 6:30pm. An exhibition catalog with essay by Meher McArthur is available. For additional information, see carnegieam.org.

 

Location:  Carnegie Art Museum/424 South C Street/ Oxnard, CA/ 805.385.8157/8  / carnegieam.org

Hours: Thurs- Sat 10am-5pm & Sun 1-5pm.  Closed holidays and during exhibit installation.

attached images credits:

Seven Cranes Triptych (right panel detail), acrylic and graphite on Arches paper, 30 x 70 in. by Joanne Julian, 2016.

Silver Snake, graphite and Prismacolor on Arches paper, 30 x 44 in. by Joanne Julian, 2016.

LISA HORAN
Visitor and Media Services Specialist

Carnegie Art Museum
424 South C Street
Oxnard, CA 93030
805.385.8254

HOURS:  Thurs. – Sat. 10 am- 5 pm / Sun. 1 – 5 pm

“Romance Me” Novel Writing Contest Winners Announced

28 February 2017

Judges from Top Romance Imprints Select Winners of Romance Writing Contest for Prizes, Promotion on Romance Junkies

AUSTIN, TX | FEB. 14, 2017  — Submission Platform and Publishing AI and startup AUTHORS.me today announced the winners of its “Romance Me” Novel Writing Contest, open to original romance novels not previously published by a traditional publisher. First place went to Time’s Firebird by Rachel Mannino; second place to Stripped Bounty by Dorothy F. Shaw; third to Not Even Death by Emerson Clarey.

The winning novels represent the diverse breadth of the Romance genre. First place winner Time’s Fireird is historical romance with elements of science fiction. “Taken captive by a Viking, time-traveling anthropologist Fiona Dale must find some way home,” reads the hook. “She falls in love with her amorous abductor, but if she stays, she’ll destroy history.” Maninno has published two novels: Love or Justice (Limitless Press), and Fractal (eTreasures).

 

Stripped Bounty is a romantic thriller/suspense exploring the complicated, harrowing relationship between Rosie Santini and the bouncer of the club she dances after her drug-running husband gets himself killed. “Badger finally got Rosie in his bed, but in order to keep her there, he has to figure out how to save her life,” reads the hook. Shaw has published nine novels, including three with Samhain and one with Forever, an imprint of Grand Central Books.

 

Not Even Death is a Young Adult Paranormal Romance “inspired by what it means to love in the face of unexpected tragedy and how to move past crippling loss. ” said Clarey. The novel centers around the friendship between two girls–one living, one dead–who vow to “help a troubled boy with a death wish find his way back to hope.”

 

Mannino has been awarded a cash prize of $200 and will see the first chapter of Time’s Fire Bird excerpted on the popular romance book website, Romance Junkies. Both runners up received a cash prize, and Shaw will receive a professional query consultation. All three novels will be featured on the AUTHORS.me acquisitions platform and highlighted in the company’s February newsletter sent to the publishers and agents who use the platform.

 

For more information on the winning novels, click here.

 

Over 300 writers submitted original novels to the contest, which was open to submissions from October 15 through December 15. Judges for the contest hail from some of the top Romance imprints in the country: Lexi Smail, Editorial Assistant at Forever and Forever Yours (Hachette Book Group); Marissa Sangiacomo, Marketing Manager at St. Martin’s Press, specializing in all Swerve, SMP and Griffin Romance titles (Macmillan); and Katherine Pelz, Associate Editor of romance, women’s fiction, and mystery at Berkley/NAL (Penguin/Random House).

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ABOUT AUTHORS, INC.

AUTHORS, Inc. is an Austin-based technology company modernizing the creative discovery process. They bring efficiency and machine intelligence to submissions, providing smart tools for writers, agents, publishers, and producers with a content acquisition platform and predictive analytics.

The Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest

28 February 2017

The Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest
Win $1,000 for a humor poem – no fee

Sponsored by Winning Writers,
one of the 101 Best Websites for Writers (Writer’s Digest)
Deadline April 1, 2017

Winning Writers - best resources for poets and writers

Jendi Reiter

The 16th annual Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest welcomes your entry through April 1. There’s no fee to enter. Jendi Reiter will judge, assisted by Lauren Singer. We’ll award $2,250 in prizes, including a top prize of $1,000. Winners are published on the Winning Writers website.

This contest welcomes published and unpublished work. Your poem may have up to 250 lines. One poem only, please. Submit online via Submittable.

Click to submit your humor poem

Please enjoy our judges’ remarks from our previous contest:

Thanks to everyone who entered our 15th annual Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest. 4,834 contestants made us laugh, cringe, scratch our heads, and look over our shoulders for an angry deity with a lightning bolt. We tried to give equal offense to all belief systems and genders, but not kick anyone when they were down. The best of the worst are now online for your enjoyment.First-round screener Lauren Singer took time out from her important work of providing mental health services in the Pioneer Valley and managing the 2016 campaign of Hillary Kitten & Floor Potato. She passed a shortlist of about 75 poems to final judge Jendi Reiter.

Lauren shares some impressions of this year’s entries:

“As is the case with every year that I have had the privilege of judging for Wergle Flomp, it is hard to read through 5,000 poems and not notice some ongoing themes. Take 2014, for example, where I managed to tally-up well over two hundred poems centered just around squirrels! What was that about? It seems that given the times, the trends, and the political climate of our current world, we would be hard-pressed to not overlap our ideas from time to time. After all, that platitude about innovation exists for a reason: ‘If you’ve thought it, it already exists on the Internet.’ Wergle Flomp is a testament to that.”While we had the typical poems ranging from zombie take-overs to dystopian apocalypse, lowbrow digs at ex-partners, sneering sarcastic quips at the expense of millennials, and my ever-favorite litanies against aging, the over-arching motif of Wergle Flomp 2016 was…wait for it…our upcoming American election! Given the constant media frenzy overflowing from every possible outlet, it’s no wonder we had so many entries related to Hillary’s pantsuits and Trump’s tiny hands; tongue-in-cheek references to lesser evils and Hitler-like comparisons. But what was most lacking from the majority of these poems was, more often than not, wit and originality.

“Yes, yes we know. It is the job of our public to make mockery of politicians, to caricature those that take themselves too seriously, but honestly? If I never have to read one more poem about Trump’s comb-over or Hillary’s email scandal, it won’t be too soon. The real problems here were not the reference to the topical—of course those come up, how could they not?—but the fact that attempts at parody, political discourse, and satire often turned into a cliché summary of everything we already know about our most revered (or despised) current candidates. Instead of observational narrative on every stereotype already documented, why not an elaboration or an inventive ‘what-if’ format? Our political poems this year were hyperbolic and fantastical, yes, much like our candidates themselves. But we missed out on opportunities for real novel creativity on most accounts.”Lastly, lackluster poetry usually has something in common: either it’s too long or it’s too short. If your poem starts really strong and then just seems to end mid-stanza without packing a one-two punch, it’s going to leave your reader feeling disappointed. No cigarette after that tryst, you know? On the other hand, if your poem has been rattling on for eight pages and you keep continue to feed us the punch-line with the assumption that your audience hasn’t already figured out your intention a thousand words ago, you’re going to bore your reader. There’s nothing worse than tuning out of a piece half-way through, especially when it started out with good potential. So make sure these babies are edited, polished, and perfected.”

Our 2016 WinnersParallels were the order of the day in this year’s list. S. Michael Wilson’s first-prize poem “Dick Candles”, a riff on a suggestive novelty gift, finds its distaff-side partner in runner-up Christina Myers’s “Tampon Bullet, Direct Hit”, a compendium of comically humiliating anecdotes, while Laura Docter’s rhyming saga “Once Upon a Vagina” brings male and female parts together for a romantic rebellion against purity culture. Debra McQueen’s “Bad Buddha”, about a meditation student who “is Buddhist like a Mafioso is Catholic”, shares the sacrilegious stage with Michael Forrester’s “Gomorrah’s Sins”, a tour de force of double-entendres about a vicar and his favorite organ player.

Vicki Wilke’s “Note to the Substitute Teacher” and Garry Somers’ “Profanity – (lalochezia)” put a brave face on the challenges of civilizing our little darlings. Sarah Crowe’s “The Ballad of the Social Media Machine”, Danny Caine’s “The Ideal Budweiser Customer Watches a Budweiser Commercial”, and Michelle Reiter’s Untitled (“The dog and I are watching the debate…”) are perfectly pitched imitations of the hysterical trivia that floods us from the media. I hope you will retweet this, fellow human!Bearing the sole prize for parody this year on his heroic shoulders, George Northrup’s “Ulysses of Astoria” shovels his driveway while channeling the spirit of Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Finally, Ralph Gagliardo treats us to some old-fashioned groaners about Dracula and friends playing “Poker After Dark”. Don’t raise the stake! (Ba-dum-bum.)

“Dick Candles” surged ahead of our other favorites because it didn’t stop with the initial joke premise, but creatively expanded on it, at just the right length. The humor builds as the speaker’s language becomes more florid and sensuous, moving from embarrassment to excitement as he imagines different scenarios for making use of these phallus-shaped illumination devices. Plus, we think it would be a great sports-commentator name: “Reporting live from Super Bowl 50, it’s Dick Candles!”“Tampon Bullet, Direct Hit” was like a modern-day “I Love Lucy” clips reel, with one after another cringe-making and relatable social gaffes. From the feminine product projectile that hits her junior-high crush in the chest, to losing her shirt in the car-wash vacuum when a cute guy walks by, our heroine is still a winner as long as she can laugh at herself.

All the Wergle Flomp winning poems and judges’ comments going back to 2002 are available for reading in our website archives.

Submit your 2017 entry now at
WinningWriters.com/wergle