Posts Tagged ‘Freelance Writing’

Wow! Women-on-Writing is Seeking Bloggers for The Muffin

4 November 2016
If you’re a blogger and a WOW! subscriber, you may be the perfect fit for this position!
We are looking for a writer who is motivated and active in the writing community. Someone who isn’t afraid to share her personal experiences in the writing/publishing industry and wants to help fellow writers.
Posts are roughly 500 words, and can be about anything you’d like to write about, as long as it’s helpful to writers.
Some of the topics we cover are:
– How-tos on a variety of writing topics (how to query, how to craft a character, etc)
– In the trenches stories (your experiences or other writers’ experiences in the publishing industry, as a freelancer, etc)
– Inspirational writing advice or reading (no straight book reviews unless it’s tied in to a writing lesson)
– Interviews with authors/agents/editors/publishers (these types of posts are usually assigned and pay more)
– Author platform and book marketing advice
– Listicles related to writing
– Balancing life and writing
– Event coverage (writing conferences, festivals, literary events)
– Market profiles (how to write for a paying magazine or website)
& more! 

How it works: If you are chosen, you will be added to a Google calendar and entered into the blog’s posting rotation. You are responsible for writing, proofreading, choosing an image, and scheduling your post to publish on the day that you are assigned. We publish in the early morning, typically between 12:30am and 4am PST, and that’s why we call it The Muffin. The Muffin is meant to be read with your morning coffee, tea, or juice. 🙂 At the end of the month, you’d send an invoice via PayPal for all the posts you’ve written during the month. Please note, we do not issue checks any longer. The Muffin pays $10 per post you come up with yourself, and more for special assignments like interviews ($15-$40, depending on the interviewee) or assigned book reviews ($20). All posts are roughly around 500 words, give or take, but interviews tend to run longer.

The Muffin has roughly 36,000+ pageviews a month, over 1,000 email subscribers and a few hundred blogger followers. We promote posts heavily on our social networks (Facebook & Twitter), as well as in our email newsletters that go out to subscribers to our main site (WOW! Women On Writing, over 38,000 email subscribers).

Apply: If you’d like to join our team, focus on your writing career, and help other writers, please e-mail us at muffinblogger@wow-womenonwriting.com (both blog manager Marcia Peterson, and publisher Angela Mackintosh will receive the application).
– Tell us why you’d like to write for The Muffin and where you are headed with your writing career.
– Please include samples of blog posts you’ve written, your current bio, and provide us with a few possible headlines of posts you’d like to write.

NOTE: If you are interested, please apply ASAP. We posted this call on Sunday on The Muffin and already have received many wonderful applications from qualified candidates. We will most likely make a decision this week!

We look forward to hearing from you!

Visit our website: http://muffin.wow-womenonwriting.com/

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KEEP 13 IN PLAY: by C. Hope Clark of FundsforWriters.com

6 June 2016

I cover this subject annually, and each year it seems to draw lots of appreciative emails in return.

All writers should freelance. It’s a grand way to develop a platform as well as get paid. But we often don’t know when to submit, or how many times is enough. We can become so wrapped up in waiting to hear back that we neglect pitching, too. So here’s a plan to aid you in managing the freelance writing part of your career.

Keep 13 in Play is my tool. It consists of three spreadsheets (or just lists, if you like). In essence, you switch the same information around for the three lists, but you’ll see why.

SHEET 1) – Date sent, name of article, name of publication, contact, follow-up date, notes
SHEET 2) – Name of article, name of publication, date, follow-up date, notes
SHEET 3) – Name of publication, name of articles, date, follow-up date, notes

Why the difference?

With Sheet 1, you keep up with your activity on a daily basis – measuring your work output and offering a sheet to be used for your income tax filing.

With Sheet 2, you keep up with where you continue to send any particular article. For instance, if it doesn’t work for Magazine A, you sent it to Magazine B, and when you’re rejected by Magazine B, you sent it to Magazine C. You monitor where an article is at any time.

With Sheet 3, you keep up with markets. This way you don’t accidentally pitch the same piece to the same market. It also shows you over time the types of articles certain publications appreciate.

This system keeps you streamlined and organized, which should raise your acceptance rate. So what’s the 13 mean? Frankly, you can pick whatever number you desire. I use 13 just so I can stare the unlucky number in the eye in defiance, but you can use 10, 25, or whatever you prefer. While those numbers seem high, they are not. You’ll never be accepted for all 13 at once, but still, if you are, that’s just plain marvelous.

Your goal is to perpetually keep 13 in play. Your number drop to 12 because of an acceptance or rejection? Stop and pitch to maintain that 13. Keep 13 queries in play . . . always. You’ll soon learn to forget the list until someone responds, and then you instantly refill it to 13. It becomes all about the pitching, not the looking back and waiting for a reply.

~By C. Hope Clark, an author and editor at:  http://www.fundsforwriters.com

Freelance Writing Markets & Jobs

20 May 2016

WELL FAMILY – THE NEW YORK TIMES
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/category/family/?_r=0
http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/contact/directory.html
A new blog for news about parenting, child health and relationships, with advice also from experts to help every family live well. Pays $100.

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THE TABLET
http://www.tabletmag.com/about
Tablet is a daily online magazine of Jewish news, ideas, and culture. Tablet welcomes submissions from freelance writers. Please submit a full pitch — including a detailed description of what you’d like to write, a brief biography, links to previously published stories, and, if necessary, a short writing sample — to the appropriate section editor. Do not submit a completed piece.

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UPWORTHY
http://www.upworthy.com/pitch-us
Upworthy reaches a massive audience with meaningful stories every day, and we’re looking for original stories that support our mission of creating a better world. Pays up to $200 for 500-word pieces.

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TWOPLUSTWO MAGAZINE
http://www.twoplustwo.com/magazine/contribute.php
The Two Plus Two Internet Magazine accepts articles on any topic related to poker or gambling. Articles should be about 1,000-2,000 words. If accepted, we will pay a fee of $200 (per article) by the end of the month after the article appears on www.twoplustwo.com.

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JOBS….

AUTUMN MAGAZINE SEEKS FREELANCER
http://azarts.gov/jobs/article-writers-autumn-magazine/
http://www.autumnmagazine.com/
Looking for someone who possesses strong writing and editing skills. Task is to write one article per month based on monthly theme. Articles are no more than 500 words per article. Examples can be seen in the digital magazine subscription of Autumn Magazine by subscribing for free at www.autumnmagazine.com/subscribe .
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Writing Topics Needed:

Deadline May 27, 2016

Quizzes – based on theme for the month; Art – Poetry, critique on current movies, tv shows, are books; and Media & Culture – Opinion pieces and reports on current events unfolding in the media or apart of our culture. Apply by sending an email to jayme@autumnmagazine.com with a writing example and category of interest.

The Biggest Error of a New Writer

20 May 2016

Here lately I’ve received a rash of emails asking me how to become a freelance writer and make money. Well, actually, they ask how they can write and get paid by me, and then they ask me to mentor them so that their writing is good enough.

So, let’s look at this for a moment . . . I’m supposed to take on someone who is not a commercial writer, teach them how to write such that it IS marketable, then pay them $50 for 500 words that fit FundsforWriters.

Some submitters become quite disgruntled when I refuse them. Some pitch me anyway, then when I reject (always with reasons to help them learn), they get angry that I am not giving a new writer a chance by educating them how to write it better.

Note to writers everywhere: It is not an editor’s job to teach you how to write. When you pitch, you are professing to already know the craft. It should be only a matter of the writer’s pitch fitting the need of the publication.

The best ways to learn how to write for a publication:

1) Read all the freelance chapters in a Writers Market.
2) Read enough of the publication you’re pitching to understand their style.
3) Read the guidelines and study the editorial calendar (if available).
4) Ensure your writing is polished enough so that the editor wants to read more.
5) Know the Chicago Manual of Style.

Second note to writers: Editors are not there to edit your work for you. They are there to edit for the publication, to find the best topics for their readers and then edit the stories to fit the space.

Take the time to learn how to write well. Then take the time to learn how to pitch smart. Do not use editors for your trial and error learning process. Find beta readers and critique groups to test drive your work.

You cannot undo a first impression, and yes, many editors remember. An idea that doesn’t quite fit is one thing….not knowing how to write is quite another.

Freelance writing resources for the new freelance writer:

http://www.therenegadewriter.com/
http://www.makealivingwriting.com/
http://www.writersmarket.com/

By C. Hope Clark, award-winning author of the Carolina Slade Mystery Series, creator and editor at http://www.fundsforwriters.com