Posts Tagged ‘WinningWriters.com’

Deadline Sept 30! Our Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest

28 September 2017

Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest – Last Call!

Your opportunity to enter this contest closes at the end of the day on September 30, 2017. That’s midnight Eastern US time on Saturday night. Already entered? Additional poems are welcome. We’ll award $1,500 to the best poem in any style, and $1,500 to the best poem that rhymes or has a traditional style. 10 honorable mentions will receive $100 each. Submit published or unpublished work. The top 12 poems will be published online. Submit at  winningwriters.com/tompoetry

$12 entry fee per poem. Submit as many poems as you like. No restriction on country or age of author. Judge: S. Mei Sheng Frazier, assisted by Jim DuBois. This contest is sponsored by Winning Writers, one of the “101 Best Websites for Writers” (Writer’s Digest).

Prefer to Enter by Mail?

Send your entry and fee to: Winning Writers, Attn: Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest, 351 Pleasant Street, PMB 222, Northampton, MA 01060-3961, USA. Checks must be drawn on US banks in US funds. You may also send US currency. Postmark your entry by September 30.

Questions?

See past winners and more contest information at winningwriters.com/tompoetry

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TOM HOWARD/MARGARET REID POETRY CONTEST

10 July 2017

15th year. Top prize for a poem in 
any style: $1,500. Top prize for a poem 
that rhymes or has a traditional 
style: $1,500. Total prizes: $4,000.

Both published and unpublished work 
accepted. Winning entries published 
online.

Deadline: September 30, 2017

Fee: $12 for each poem. Length limit: 250 lines

per poem. Final judge: Soma Mei Sheng Frazier.

See guidelines and past winners at 
https://winningwriters.com/tompoetry

Winning Writers is one of the 101 Best

Websites for Writers (Writer’s Digest).

Join our 91,000 followers on Twitter

at @winningwriters

Deadline April 30: $1,500 For a Story, $1,500 For an Essay

3 April 2017

$1,500 For a Story, $1,500 For an Essay

Judy Juanita

The deadline is April 30, 2017 to enter this year’s Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest. We’ll award 12 cash prizes totaling $4,000. The winning entries will be published on our website. The top winners will receive prominent exposure on our home page.

Key contest information:

  • New final judge: Judy Juanita (see her advice)
  • Top prizes: Best Story, $1,500; Best Essay, $1,500
  • Submit as many entries as you like
  • Entry fee: $18 per entry
  • Enter online using Submittable
  • Length limit: 6,000 words per entry
  • Subject: Any
  • Previously published work OK? Yes
  • Writers from all countries eligible
  • Past winning entries with judges’ remarks: See our archives
Click to submit your entry

Questions? Please email adam@winningwriters.com.

Can’t Enter Online?

If you are using a mobile device, or are otherwise having difficulty using our online entry system, you may mail your entry to:

Winning Writers
Attn: Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest
351 Pleasant Street, PMB 222
     Northampton, MA 01060-3961
     USA

Please include a check or money order for $18 payable to Winning Writers, and note your email address and phone number with your payment. You may mail multiple submissions in a single envelope with one combined payment. Please send US funds drawn on a US bank, or send your fee as US currency.

Enter Our Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest

10 February 2017

Enter Our Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest

Judy JuanitaOur 25th annual Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest welcomes your entries through April 30. Our final judge this year is Judy Juanita, author of the novel Virgin Soul and of De Facto Feminism: Essays Straight Outta Oakland. She will be assisted by Lauren Singer. We will award $4,000 in prizes, including two top awards of $1,500 each. Winners are published on our website.

This contest welcomes published and unpublished work. Each entry may have up to 6,000 words. You may enter as often as you like. The reading fee is $18 per entry.

Click to submit your stories and essays

Please enjoy Ms. Juanita’s advice to contestants:

My favorite bedtime reading is the great Irish writer Frank O’Connor. I never tire of his short stories or insights. Rather than pretending to have great advice, I defer to him because I have an affinity for what he terms “might-have-beens” or “outlawed figures wandering at the fringes of society.” O’Connor said, “There is in the short story at its most characteristic something we do not often find in the novel—an intense awareness of human loneliness.” (The Best of Frank O’Connor, Knopf, 2009). He also wrote extensively about childhood though he was an only child. He’s said, “Children…see only one side of any question and because of their powerlessness see this with hysterical clarity.” So that’s a small essential for writing—look at marginalia, the smallest, youngest, the never-was, the never-will-be.Tim O’Brien talks of the consoling power of stories: “If I’m lying in bed at night I’m a little less lonely in a lonely universe. Stories connect me not just to other people, but to myself.” Is that another way of saying you need to write a feel-good story? It is not. When we manage to plumb the heart, we touch the reader’s heart. It may sting, comfort, sadden, dishearten even, but the touch is the measuring rod.

Essays are a horse of a different color. Opaque doesn’t work well in essays; a through line does. I want to follow the complexity of an argument but need markers along the way, like subheadings and bullets. The main lesson I’ve learned from writing a column is the necessity of moving from the personal to the universal/global. Being 100% personal reads as smug or self-indulgent and tries the reader’s patience. Being transparent has enormous value, but the writer has to lead the reader from the deeply intimate detail, e.g. a family tragedy, through extrapolation to the deeper meaning in the detail.Sometimes, the elements of an essay are like a family—they don’t all get along. Some people suffer from too little or too much closeness to a relative. Nowhere is copy and paste handier than in essay writing. Set your essay with care like you would a family dinner. And, remember, you can’t invite everybody to everything, even if they are family. You can’t dump all your set pieces into one essay.

All the winning entries and judges’ comments from the past decade are available for reading in our website archives.

Submit your 2017 entries now at
WinningWriters.com/tomstory